What You Leave Behind


Spotlight looks at the idea of a legacy and how others remember us after we die. What is your legacy?

Watch Video


Transcript


Voice 1  

Welcome to Spotlight. I’m Bruce Gulland.

Voice 2  

And I’m Liz Waid. Spotlight uses a special English method of broadcasting. It is easier for people to understand, no matter where in the world they live.

Voice 1  

David Blake was born in 1988. He was a healthy boy. And he became a healthy young man who loved his life. He made computer games. And he enjoyed his work in a library lending books to the public. But when he was 27, the doctors told David that he had cancer in his leg. The doctors removed the cancer. But it returned and went to his lungs. David died a few weeks after his 30th birthday. But that was not the end of David’s story.

Voice 2  

Some people live a long life. Other people do not live long at all. But we all will die. It is part of life. Today’s program is not really about death. Today’s Spotlight is on how people remember us and what we leave behind after we die.

Voice 1  

David’s death was not the end of his story. That is because David left a legacy. In fact, every person can leave a legacy. Bart Astor is a writer for Forbes magazine. He wrote about the idea of a legacy:

Voice 3  

"We all want to be remembered. We want to feel that we have added something to the world. For some people, this can push them to great things. But for most of us with more simple goals, what pushes us is the desire to leave a legacy. Your legacy is putting your mark on the future. There are many ways you can leave a legacy. And your legacy is about far more than material things. Most of what we leave our children and grandchildren are memories of who we are and what was important to us.”

Voice 2  

Leaving a legacy is not just about leaving money or physical goods for people you love. People do need money to buy what they need, like food, shelter, and education. People can also use money to buy what they want, like new clothes, a phone, or a special car. People can give money to organizations that help people. However, a legacy is more about who we are as people. But physical things can sometimes help people remember our legacy. David was very young when he died. But when he died, he left a legacy. His mother Katy, says,

Voice 4  

“David is everywhere I look. I see his hundreds of Japanese manga books and remember him reading them. I also remember how he treated his books with care and respect. I see computers in the house and I remember the hours David spent building them. I see his microphone and remember him talking into it as he broadcast his Twitch program. I see his favourite cup and remember him drinking his favourite green tea from it. I see his glasses and remember his eyes.”

Voice 1  

Many people put pictures on social media to help remember fun events or people. Pictures and videos can also be a part of a legacy. They cannot show the whole life a person lived. But they can help people remember the sights, sounds, and tastes of whatever is happening in the picture. These memories are often very powerful. Katy remembers her son David. She says,

Voice 4  

“The memories I most treasure are simple things. My head resting on his shoulder. One of his big hands holding both of mine as he made me laugh. His laugh as he played computer games, read manga books, or listened to the radio and watched vlogs.”

Voice 2  

Some people are remembered for the way they have shaped the world. These could be leaders who made the world better - or worse. Some people are remembered for how they served other people. Mother Theresa worked with very poor people in India. She helped people who did not have homes and were very sick or dying. She was not trying to be remembered. She was only trying to help other people. But today, people remember Mother Teresa for starting a movement to care for people no one else wanted to care for.

Voice 1  

You may not be able to live your life in service to the poor. But you can try and make the world a better place. You affect other people at school, work, or on the street. Every day offers you a chance to make the world a better place. David was not a political leader or an important celebrity. Katy explains,

Voice 4  

“David made the world a better place in many small everyday ways. He was a gentle man full of good humour and kindness. He helped old people who lived near him. He taught them how to use computers and solved their technical problems. The people David worked with said that he put his whole heart into providing the best service he could. His online friend Bvork told us, ‘He never had a bad thing to say about anyone. He was always supportive and nice to everyone. All I can say is that we loved him and that he will be remembered with love by all of us'.”

Voice 2  

You can try to create a legacy. Yet, you cannot control how people remember you after you die. Many of the people we remember — artists, political leaders, or teachers — were not famous during their life. And many rich and famous people from the past are forgotten today. However, it may help to think about death a little more. Our understanding of death shapes how we live. When people believe that there is life after death, they will live a different kind of life. David Blake believed this. His mother explains:

Voice 4  

“When David was told that the cancer had returned, the first words out of his mouth were very special. He said, ‘We have a God of hope and miracles.’ He knew that God could perform a miracle and heal him. But he also knew that he had the hope of eternal life. He knew he would have life after death. So he was able to be positive and joyful while he was so sick.”

Voice 1  

Do you think there is life after death? What would you like to be remembered for? What do you think is your legacy? Tell us what you think. You can leave a comment on our website. Or email us at radio@radioenglish.net. You can also comment on Facebook at Facebook.com/spotlightradio.

Voice 2  

The writers of this program were Adam Navis and Katy Blake. The producer was Michio Ozaki. The voices you heard were from the United Kingdom and the United States. All quotes were adapted for this program and voiced by Spotlight. You can listen to this program again, and read it, on the internet at www.radioenglish.net. This program is called, ‘What You Leave Behind.’

Voice 1  

Visit our website to download our free official app for Android or Apple devices. We hope you can join us again for the next Spotlight program. Goodbye.

Question:

How will people remember you after you die? What would you like to be remembered for?

Comments


Severino Ramos da Silva's avatar
Severino Ramos da Silva
said on November 21, 2018

From: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
To: spotlight programme
Subject: to answer to the questions below
Date: Wednesday 21, November 2018
São Paulo city - São Paulo Brazil

Dear Liz Waid, Bruce Gulland, Katy Blake, and Michio Ozaki:

First, I want to thank you for bringing us more one great article, thank you.
Question 1 - Do you think there is life after death? Yes, I do. My answer to that question is positive because I have a guardian angel who tell me some important things in my dreams when I am sleeping which will happen before it happens.
Question 2 - What do you think is your legacy? Well, I am an ordinary person but I respect so much my job and my patients and people. So, I think that my co - wokers will say to each other Severino Ramos was a respectful nurse. He worked very well and he took care of his patients in a special way.  I think that will be my legacy when I die.
Question 3 - How will people remember you after you die? I do no know but I think my co - workers will say he should not have died. We are missing him.
Question 4 - What would you like to be remembered for? I would like to be remembered that people, (doctors and nurses) do not burn my body, do not cut no part of my body, and do not take out no organ from my body.
Finally, I want to thank you again by that important article, thank you very much. Goodbye!
Your regards,
Severino Ramos
From Brazil

Kaleb Kolaibi's avatar
Kaleb Kolaibi
said on November 22, 2018

First; I would like to offer my condolences to Katy Blake for having lost her son, David.
Second; I did not make anything good to world (Although I tried and still try). So I do not have any legacy and I think that not one remember me after dead.
God bless you

Avatar Spotlight
Honneur
said on November 22, 2018

I do not believe in life after death. If you die you will be died. End. I would like to be remembered like a very hard worker, with no vices of any species and ever concerned with my family welfare.